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 Post subject: Sunlight-powered plane at Ohio in circumnavigation quest
PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2016 4:37 pm 
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Solar Impulse 2 lands in Ohio: Sunlight-powered plane reaches Wright brothers' city in latest stop on round-the-world quest

By Abigail Beall For Mailonline

Published: 22:03 EST, 21 May 2016 | Updated: 06:37 EST, 23 May 2016


A sun-powered aircraft, Solar Impulse 2, has finished the latest leg in its record-breaking quest to circle the globe without consuming a drop of fuel.

Swiss adventurer Andre Borschberg landed the aircraft in Dayton, Ohio, late on Saturday as he finished the twelfth leg of the round-the-world trip in the experimental solar-powered aircraft.

The plane is expected to make at least one more stop in the US before crossing the Atlantic Ocean to Europe or northern Africa.

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Solar Impulse 2 has finished the latest leg in its record-breaking quest to circle the globe without consuming a drop of fuel. Swiss adventurer Bertrand Piccard (left) and pilot Andre Borschberg landed in Dayton, Ohio, late on Saturday as he finished the twelfth leg of the round-the-world trip in the experimental solar-powered aircraft

The twelfth leg lasted 16 hours 34 minutes, Mr Borschberg took off from Tulsa International Airport before 5am local time (6am ET/11am BST) on Saturday.


HOW DOES SOLAR IMPULSE WORK?

Solar Impulse 2 is powered by 17,000 solar cells and on-board rechargeable lithium batteries, allowing it to fly through the night.

Its wingspan is longer than a jumbo jet but its light construction keeps its weight to about as much as a car.

Solar Impulse 2 relies on getting enough solar power during the day to survive the night.

It is also extremely light - about the weight of a car - and as wide as a passenger jet.

Both of these combined means it is extremely susceptible to the weather.

In high winds it can struggle to stay aloft at the altitudes necessary to gather sunlight.

After taking off in the darkness, the aircraft soared to an altitude of 11,463 feet (3,500 metres) as the sun began to rise over the horizon.

Mr Borschberg flew the aircraft 692 miles (1,113km), taking 20 minute catnaps before returning to the controls as he passed over Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, until finally arriving in Ohio.

The city of Dayton is important to Mr Borschberg and his fellow pilot Bertrand Piccard because it was the home of the Wright Brothers, the first men to fly a power-driven aircraft heavier than air.

'People told the Wright Brothers and us what we wanted to achieve was impossible,' said Bertrand Piccard after landing. 'They were wrong!'

The plane is expected to make at least one more stop in the United States, in New York, before crossing the Atlantic Ocean to Europe or northern Africa, but exactly when this will happen is uncertain.

'Our team at the Monaco Mission Control Center is trying to identify a weather window,' the company website said.


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Swiss adventurer Bertrand Piccard, holding a historical model of a plane designed by the Wright brothers at Dayton International Airport, Ohio. 'People told the Wright Brothers and us what we wanted to achieve was impossible,' he said after landing. 'They were wrong!'

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Solar Impulse 2 is powered by 17,000 solar cells and on-board rechargeable lithium batteries, allowing it to fly through the night. It is also extremely light - about the weight of a car - and as wide as a passenger jet

With a wingspan exceeding that of a Boeing 747 but an ultra-light carbon-fiber skin and overall weight of a car, the Solar Impulse cruises at speeds ranging from only 34 to 62 miles per hour (55 to 100 km/h).

The four engines of the propeller-driven aircraft are powered exclusively by energy collected from more than 17,000 solar cells built into its wings.

Excess energy is stored in four batteries during daylight hours to keep the plane flying after dark.
THE JOURNEY

The globe-circling voyage began in March 2015 from Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, and made stops in Oman, Myanmar, China and Japan.

Piccard and Andre Borschberg have been taking turns piloting the plane on each leg of the journey.

Both have trained to stay alert for long stretches of time by practicing meditation and hypnosis.

Borschberg set a new endurance record for the longest non-stop solo flight last July during a 118-hour trans-Pacific crossing, over five days and five nights, from Japan to Hawaii.

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A world map shows the path of the solar powered-plane so far, as it continues to cross the United States. Today's stage will take Solar Impulse across the mid US, heading towards New York for its next major challenge - crossing the Atlantic Ocean

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Picture taken by Swiss adventurer Andre Borschberg onboard Solar Impulse 2 during the flight from Tusla to Dayton shows the Mississippi river at sunset


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Solar Impulse 2 in preparation for the take off from Tulsa International Airport early on Saturday morning. The four engines of the propeller-driven aircraft are powered exclusively by energy collected from more than 17,000 solar cells built into its wings

The globe-circling voyage began in March 2015 from Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, and made stops in Oman, Myanmar, China and Japan.

The plane can climb to 28,000 feet (8,500 meters), but generally flies at lower altitudes at night to conserve energy.

Mr Piccard and Mr Borschberg have been taking turns piloting the plane on each leg of the journey. Both have trained to stay alert for long stretches of time by practicing meditation and hypnosis.


Image
The inflatable hangar installed on the tarmac in Dayton, Ohio. The city of Dayton is important to Mr Piccard and Mr Borschberg because it was the home of the Wright Brothers, the first men to fly a power-driven aircraft heavier than air


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Solar Impulse 2 in preparation for the take off from Tulsa International Airport, Oklahoma, before starting the latest leg of its round-the-world trip, landing 17 hours later in Dayton, Ohio. After taking off in the darkness, the aircraft soared to an altitude of 11,463 feet (3,500 metres)

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Bertrand Piccard and Andre Borschberg (pictured taking off in Tulsa, Oklahoma) have been taking turns piloting the plane on each leg of the journey. Both have trained to stay alert for long stretches of time by practicing meditation and hypnosis

Borschberg set a new endurance record for the longest non-stop solo flight last July during a 118-hour trans-Pacific crossing, over five days and five nights, from Japan to Hawaii.

He also set new duration and distance records for solar-powered flight. Battery damage sustained during the crossing kept the aircraft grounded for nine months.

The Swiss team's ultimate goal is to achieve the first round-the-world solar-powered flight, part of its campaign to bolster support for clean-energy technologies.


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The Solar Impulse 2 is built from a range of lightweight materials and high storage batteries (illustrated) to help keep the experimental aircraft in the air for long periods using just the power from sunlight

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Piccard and Borschberg have been taking turns flying the plane on an around-the-world trip since taking off from Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, in March 2015. The plane's maximum altitude is 27,900ft (8,500m) but this drops to 3,280ft (1,000m), when the pilot is able to take short 20-minute catnaps. The route is pictured.



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3602995/The-Latest-Solar-powered-lands-Ohio.html

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 Post subject: Re: Sunlight-powered plane at Ohio in circumnavigation quest
PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2016 1:11 pm 
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Godspeed to Capt. Piccard

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 Post subject: Re: Sunlight-powered plane at Ohio in circumnavigation quest
PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2016 9:34 am 
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Interesting starting in Abu-Dhabi.

It makes a ton of sense.

I would imagine the did a ton of preflight testing in Abu-Dhabi. Tons of non-stop sunshine for exhaustive testing of the cells, batteries, etc.
Then they are assured of starting with a full charge and constant sunlight when they start the trip.


Its landing at Lehigh Valley Airport tonight.


Quote:
Maybe they can call it Solar Impulse 2, take two.

After a one-day delay because of safety concerns, the sun-powered aircraft on a record-breaking flight around the world is scheduled to land at Lehigh Valley International Airport at 9 p.m. tonight.

The slow-moving plane, flown by Swiss pilots Bertrand Piccard and Andre Borschberg, was initially expected to arrive at LVIA late Tuesday, but that flight was scrubbed because of damage to the plane's mobile hangar.

After a day of delay that allowed the crew to make sure the plane was not damaged, the Solar Impulse 2 took off from Dayton at 4 a.m. for the Lehigh Valley, according to its Twitter account.

You can follow Bertrand Piccard, the initiator, chairman and pilot of the Solar Impulse 2, on his Twitter account @bertrandpiccard. Cockpit cameras are turned on so you can follow the journey at www.solarimpulse.com.
Solar-Powered Plane Voyage Coming To An End Soon

A solar-powered airplane that landed in Oklahoma last week is now on it's way to Ohio on the latest leg of its around-the-world journey. The plane is set to make at least one more stop in the United States before crossing the Atlantic Ocean to Europe or northern Africa. The globe-circling voyage began in March 2015 from Abu Dhabi, and has since made stops in Oman, Myanmar, China and Japan.

"This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for our region and community to be a part of aviation history," said Charles Everett, executive director of the Lehigh-Northampton Airport Authority. "We have constructed a temporary hangar and continue to work with the Solar Impulse team to fulfill the needs of their mission."

There is no timetable on the duration of the stay or further details on whether any public events are scheduled, Everett said.

The staff at LVIA lands planes for a living, but they haven't experienced anything quite like this before.

Unlike those giant jets that touch down at high speed and screech the wheels, using much of LVIA's more than 7,000-foot main runway, the Solar Impulse will glide in at less than 30 miles per hour, while members of the Solar Impulse 2's traveling ground crew peddle along on bikes to help manually bring it to a stop.


Then LVIA has to find the right place to put it and its 236-foot wingspan — that's wider than the span of a typical 747 jet.

"This obviously is going to be a different kind of operation," Everett said. "We're excited to be part of it."

The stop in the Lehigh Valley is the 13th leg of a round-the-world mission that started last year in Abu Dhabi. The plane is the vision of Piccard to promote clean energy and conservation and to prove that continual flight will one day be possible with only the sun as fuel.

"If an airplane can fly day and night without fuel, everybody could use these same technologies on the ground to halve our world's energy consumption, save natural resources and improve our quality of life," Piccard said in a news release. "Our hope is to motivate everyone to reduce their dependence on fossil fuels in their daily lives and encourage concrete actions for sustainability."

The Solar Impulse's flight that began in March 2015 has been far from uninterrupted, but it is proving the fuel-less part is possible. The plane, which weighs a bit more than 5,100 pounds, has wings equipped with 17,000 solar cells that store power to turn the plane's propellers and charge its batteries. It enables the plane to stay in the air for days at a time, including through the night, according to its website, www.solarimpulse.com.

Flying at a typical speed of 28 miles an hour, the single-seat plane will take about 17 hours to make its way from Dayton to LVIA.

The plane's longest leg was a five-day trip from Japan to Hawaii. The trip severely damaged the plane's battery system, forcing the crew to lay over in Hawaii for nine months, before resuming the journey with a three-day trip from Hawaii to California's Silicon Valley.

From the Lehigh Valley, the plane is expected to head to JFK Airport in New York, before taking off across the Atlantic Ocean to Europe or northern Africa. From there, it is scheduled to head back to Abu Dhabi this year, according to the website documenting the journey.

It's unclear how long it will be at LVIA, but airport officials are discouraging people from sitting in their cars along area roads to catch a glimpse of the plane gliding into LVIA.

"We don't want any news helicopters in the air. We'd rather people watch the landing on the website solarimpulse.com," Everett said. "This is a fragile aircraft. We want to make sure everything goes as planned."

http://www.mcall.com/news/breaking/mc-allentown-airport-solar-impulse-again-20160524-story.html

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I'm sure she still wakes up in cold sweats and night terrors of Peyton's wrinkly ball sack pitter-pattering on her forehead.


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